Handling Repair Orders

It is a given that repairs will be necessary, sooner or later, on every property. How you handle these repair orders may determine if the tenant decides to renew the lease. In my office, tenants may submit repair requests in writing or by phone. I prefer talking directly with the tenant. Some “problems” can be resolved with a brief conversation. These might include such things as: (1) pushing the reset button on the garbage disposal, (2) resetting the electrical breaker or (3) discussing how the timed oven features work. Service calls run $50 to $85 and the owner will not want to pay to educate the tenant. Save yourself unnecessary grief, see if the problem is simple tenant error.

Peter Meer is President/Broker of Meer & Company, Inc., 303-322-1550, which manages 150 single family homes and properties in Denver, Colorado. He holds the Master Property Manager (MPM) designation and the firm holds the Certified Residential Management Company (CRMC) designation from the National Association of Residential Property Managers (NARPM). To learn more about Peter’s Landlord solutions visit Meer and Company website at www.meerandco.com

Maintaining the Physical Structure

Keep in mind that the managing agent for the rental property has the obligation to maintain the physical structure. That is not to say that he/she must pay for the repairs to the property. It is the responsibility of being the eyes and ears of the owner and reporting any serious maintenance/repair issues. The balance of these next blogs will discuss handling  (1) routine service work (2) major repairs and (3) emergency repairs.

Peter Meer is President/Broker of Meer & Company, Inc., 303-322-1550, which manages 150 single family homes and properties in Denver, Colorado. He holds the Master Property Manager (MPM) designation and the firm holds the Certified Residential Management Company (CRMC) designation from the National Association of Residential Property Managers (NARPM). To learn more about Peter’s Landlord solutions visit Meer and Company website at www.meerandco.com

Improving Control Over Properties

As previously discussed, every four weeks yards should be checked. Watering and mowing are obvious items to look for. What about shrubs, trees, derelict vehicles, peeling paint or oil stains on the driveway? Taking a picture on each visit helps in a number of ways. First, you can send it to the owner, thus letting him/her know of your continuing observation of the property. Second, you can verify that your checker has actually gone to the property.

Have these procedures eliminated all of the problems? No. They have, however, improved control over the properties, thus improving protection for the property manager and his/her clients.

Peter Meer is President/Broker of Meer & Company, Inc., 303-322-1550, which manages 150 single family homes and properties in Denver, Colorado. He holds the Master Property Manager (MPM) designation and the firm holds the Certified Residential Management Company (CRMC) designation from the National Association of Residential Property Managers (NARPM). To learn more about Peter’s Landlord solutions visit Meer and Company website at www.meerandco.com

Yard Checks

As we have discussed property management does mean property control and yard checks are very important in the management of residential property. During the summer months, the condition of the yards become a major consideration. All tenants will tell you of their love for gardening. Unfortunately, that does not always prove to be the case. Every four weeks the yards should be checked.

Peter Meer is President/Broker of Meer & Company, Inc., 303-322-1550, which manages 150 single family homes and properties in Denver, Colorado. He holds the Master Property Manager (MPM) designation and the firm holds the Certified Residential Management Company (CRMC) designation from the National Association of Residential Property Managers (NARPM). To learn more about Peter’s Landlord solutions visit Meer and Company website at www.meerandco.com

Notify Your Client

If the tenant fails to correct the problems of the specific lease violations, your options may be limited. In Colorado, it is difficult to convince a judge to terminate a lease for reasons other than nonpayment of rent. However, even if you cannot get the tenant out, you can notify your client of the problems. While this will not make for a happy owner, at least the owner knows you have been watching over his/her unit.

Peter Meer is President/Broker of Meer & Company, Inc., 303-322-1550, which manages 150 single family homes and properties in Denver, Colorado. He holds the Master Property Manager (MPM) designation and the firm holds the Certified Residential Management Company (CRMC) designation from the National Association of Residential Property Managers (NARPM). To learn more about Peter’s Landlord solutions visit Meer and Company website at www.meerandco.com

Specific Lease Violations

Upon discovery of these problems, one of a number of actions can be taken. First, advise the tenant, in writing, of the specific lease violations. Let the tenant know another survey will be conducted within three weeks and that the problems must be resolved by then. Second, if you suspect drug activity, contact your local law enforcement agency for suggested action. This may also help defend you from seizure action against the property. Third, redo your survey in three weeks to insure compliance with your letter.

Peter Meer is President/Broker of Meer & Company, Inc., 303-322-1550, which manages 150 single family homes and properties in Denver, Colorado. He holds the Master Property Manager (MPM) designation and the firm holds the Certified Residential Management Company (CRMC) designation from the National Association of Residential Property Managers (NARPM). To learn more about Peter’s Landlord solutions visit Meer and Company website at www.meerandco.com